Number of business entity employees per FTE that performs the process group "develop and manage human resources (HR) planning, policies, and strategies"

This measure calculates the number of business entity employees per full-time equivalent (FTE) employee that performs the process group "develop and manage human resources (HR) planning, policies, and strategies." Activities in this process group include workforce planning, compensation planning, succession planning, employee diversity, program design, policy administration, and policy development. This measure is a Staff Productivity measure that helps companies assess the efficiency of their staff related to the process "develop and manage human resources (HR) planning, policies and strategies."

Benchmark Data

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Measure Category:
Staff Productivity
Measure Id:
100483
Total Sample Size:
2,729 All Companies
Performers:
25th
Median
75th
Key Performance
Indicator:
Yes

Compute this Measure

Units for this measure are employees.

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Number of business entity employees / Number of FTEs who perform the process group "develop and manage human resources (HR) planning, policies, and strategies"

Key Terms

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FTE - (full-time equivalent employee)

To calculate the number of full-time equivalents employed during the year for each respective process or activity, you must prorate the number of employees and the hours spent performing each process/activity. Assume that a full-time worker represents 40 hours per week. Provide the average number of full-time equivalents employed during the year for each respective process. Include full-time employees, part-time employees, and temporary workers hired during peak demand periods. Allocate only the portion of the employee's time that relates to or supports the activities identified for an applicable process. Prorate management and secretarial time by estimating the level of effort in support of each activity, by process.

For example, a part-time secretary in the finance department for XYZ, Inc. charges all of his time to finance department activities. He works 20 hours per week. The secretary splits his time evenly supporting employees working in the general accounting process and the financial reporting process. Thus, his time should be allocated by process. So, if he works throughout the year and supports these two processes, his time would be split evenly as:

20hrs/40hrs = .5FTE * 50% for general accounting = .25FTE for general accounting

20hrs/40hrs = .5FTE * 50% for financial reporting = .25FTE for financial reporting

Staff Productivity

Staff Productivity is a measure of the efficiency of individuals performing specific processes. Measures in staff productivity generally relate the transaction volume or outcome of the process with the effort in terms of full time equivalent employees to perform the process.

Median

The metric value which represents the 50th percentile of a peer group. This could also be communicated as the metric value where half of the peer group sample shows lower performance than the expressed metric value or half of the peer group sample shows higher performance than the expressed metric value.

Full-time Employee, Part-time Employee, and Temporary Employee

Full-time Employee

For the purpose of this survey, a regular full-time employee is hired for an indefinite period of time and is normally scheduled to work forty hours per week. Appointment is continuous, subject to satisfactory performance and availability of funding.

Part-time Employee

For the purpose of this survey, a regular part-time employee is hired for an indefinite period of time and is scheduled to work less than forty hours per week.

Temporary Employee

A temporary employee is employed for a finite period of time, to fulfill a time-limited role, or to fill the role of a permanent employee who is absent from work. The length of time an employee can work for the organization and be considered a temporary employee may be governed by employment legislation.

Business Entity

For survey purposes, a business entity is defined as an entity that:

  1. performs significant aspects of the processes for the surveys identified, or
  2. is part of a cost or revenue center within the company.

Within your organization, diverse departments may be geographically co-located, with closely integrated operations that form part of one "business entity" which may be a great distance apart. When trying to determine if related parts of your operation should be considered a single business entity, look for the following characteristics:

  • Do they operate closely together?
  • Do they serve many of the same customers?
  • Do they support the same region or product group?
  • Do they share any performance measures?
  • Is data meaningful at a consolidated level?

Examples of business entity definition:

  1. A general ledger accounting unit located in Germany has two groups. One performs general ledger accounting for the corporate headquarters, which has three business units. The other group does general ledger accounting for one of the three business units. In spite of their geographic co-location, their roles are substantially different and consolidating their data into a single response would make it less meaningful. Each group should be treated as a separate business entity.
  2. Three business units within a corporation use a shared services center for accounts payable and expense reimbursement, but are self-supporting for the other financial processes. The best approach is to make the shared services centre a separate business entity for accounts payable and expense reimbursement, and to retain the three original business units for the other financial processes.
  3. A global manufacturing company has five plant locations, each manufacturing product and each with its own logistics operations. For purposes of completing a manufacturing and logistics survey, they should be treated as five separate business entities.

Measure Scope

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Cross Industry (6.0.0)

  • 6.1.1 - Develop human resources strategy (10415)
    • 6.1.1.1 - Identify strategic HR needs (10418) - Strategically defining the current and future needs for developing an efficient HR strategy.
    • 6.1.1.2 - Define HR and business function roles and accountability (10419) - Outlining the charge and duty of the HR function by defining its responsibility areas, as well as ensuring its accountability. Establish the HR function by laying out the roles and responsibilities for this function and the rules and regulations guiding HR. Define the goals and objectives of the HR, as well as a mission and vision for this function. Create a mechanism involving a set of policies, code of conduct, and institutional procedure to ensure HR accountability.
    • 6.1.1.3 - Determine HR costs (10420) - Ascertaining the costs and expenses of the HR function. Identify and report HR investments using, for example, a cost approach or a present value of future earnings approach.
    • 6.1.1.4 - Establish HR measures (10421) - Evaluating the performance of HR function. Lay out the course of HR procedures that would formulate a plan of action needed to fulfill strategic HR needs. Deploy measures such as hiring policies, leave management, internal code of conducts, and compensation structure.
    • 6.1.1.5 - Communicate HR strategies (10422) - Conveying the strategies of HR function to employees and management. Effectively explain the vision, plans, and anticipated benefits of the HR strategy employees, as well as the public. Develop statements and messages that are easy to read, informative, and relevant to the audience.
  • 6.1.2 - Develop and implement human resources plans (10416)
    • 6.1.2.1 - Gather skill requirements according to corporate strategy and market environment (10423) - Evaluating the current and future skill requirements of the organization with regard to the overall corporate strategy of the organization and market conditions. Identify and establish the minimum skills needed for the requisite HR needs.
    • 6.1.2.2 - Plan employee resourcing requirements per unit/organization (10424) - Determining the requirements for employees and the need for employee resourcing for each every unit/function. Lay out a plan detailing employee resourcing requirements of individual functions and the organization as a whole.
    • 6.1.2.3 - Develop compensation plan (10425) - Designing a plan that specifies the combination of wages, salaries, and benefits the employees receive in exchange for work. Define the total amount of compensation, in addition to the manner in which the compensation is paid and the purposes for which employees can receive bonuses, salary increases, and incentives.
    • 6.1.2.4 - Develop succession plan (10426) - Creating and implementing the plan for continuation of key positions within the organization. Identify internal people with the potential to fill key business leadership positions. Provide critical development experiences to employees who can move into important roles. Engage leaders to support the development of high-potential leaders.
    • 6.1.2.5 - Develop employee diversity plan (10427) - Creating and implementing the plan for ensuring a diverse work force. Develop and hire employees with varying characteristics including, but not limited to, religious and political beliefs, gender, ethnicity, education, socioeconomic background, sexual orientation, and geographic location.
    • 6.1.2.6 - Develop other HR programs (10428) - Creating HR programs and services such as employee engagements programs to promote positive employee behavior. Create a variety of programs and services to support employees' professional and personal needs at work and at home.
    • 6.1.2.7 - Develop HR policies (10429) - Creating rules and regulations that govern the HR function. Develop a policy plan that serves as a guideline for setting rules and regulations that help in achieving the HR goals and objectives.
    • 6.1.2.8 - Administer HR policies (10430) - Ensuring rules and regulations are followed and are flexible enough to accommodate indispensable deviations.
    • 6.1.2.9 - Plan employee benefits (10431) - Planning benefits in kind (also called fringe benefits, perquisites, or perks). Include various types of non-wage compensations provided to employees in addition to normal wages or salaries.
    • 6.1.2.10 - Develop strategy for HR systems/technologies/tools (10432) - Creating a strategy for the use of systems/technologies/tools in operating the HR function. Create a strategy concerning the use and utility of HR support tools and technologies. Decide what specific tools to use and in what quantity. Determine the levels of technology required for the HR management.
    • 6.1.2.11 - Develop work force strategy models (10433) - Creating and implementing models for effectively strategizing the work force of the organization. Develop a model that specifies the organization's overall approach for maximizing the performance of its work force by defining the goals, objectives, and expectations of the work force. Manage all aspects of performance required for the work force to function, including recruitment, selection, retention, and professional development.
  • 6.1.3 - Monitor and update plans (10417) - Supervising the HR strategy, plans, and policies in order to refurbish them whenever needed. Determine the performance of HR plans and policies by measuring the objective achievement rate and its contribution to the overall business strategy. Ensure that information about these plans and strategies is effectively communicated to various stakeholders. Incorporate any suggestions by these stakeholders when revising HR plans and policies.
    • 6.1.3.1 - Measure realization of objectives (10434) - Determining the accomplishment of HR goals and objectives. Evaluate the effectiveness of the HR function by estimating the present rate of achievement of the established objectives. Use metrics to determine if the objectives are being realized. Leverage measures such as turnover, training, return on human capital, costs of labor, and expenses per employee.
    • 6.1.3.2 - Measure contribution to business strategy (10435) - Determining the role of HR function in implementing the organizational strategy. Measure the correlation between the HR performance and the overall business strategy. Calculate the amount of contribution of the HR function to the overall business growth.
    • 6.1.3.3 - Communicate plans and provide updates to stakeholders (10436) - Conveying the plans for HR function to stakeholders. Ensure that the HR plans and strategy are effectively communicated to the people who can affect or be affected by the organization's actions, objectives, and policies such as the creditors, shareholders, employees, and suppliers. Provide regular updates to these stakeholders to ensure effective communication.
    • 6.1.3.4 - Determine value added from HR function (10437)
    • 6.1.3.5 - Review and revise HR plans (10438) - Reassessing the strategies, plans, and policies of the HR function, with the objective of revising them. Revisit the schematic plans for the HR function. Taking stock of any suggestions or feedback from the stakeholders, revamp the blueprint of HR strategies and plans.