Number of business entity employees that participate in approaches and activities included in KM program, initiative, or service per $1 billion revenue

This measure calculates the number of business entity employees that participate in approaches and activities included in the knowledge management (KM) program, initiative, or service, per $1 billion revenue. KM is responsible for organizing an entity's knowledge base; determining the kind of specialized knowledge an entity possesses, and which elements of this collective knowledge are beneficial; capturing and maintaining this knowledge; and granting access to this library of information. This measure is part of a set of Process Efficiency measures that help companies optimize their "assess KM capabilities" process by minimizing waste and refining resource consumption.

Benchmark Data

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Measure Category:
Process Efficiency
Measure Id:
106115
Total Sample Size:
217 All Companies
Performers:
25th
Median
75th
Key Performance
Indicator:
Yes

Compute this Measure

Units for this measure are employees.

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Number of employees that participate in approaches and activities included in KM program, initiative, or service / (Total business entity revenue * 0.000000001)

Key Terms

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Total Annual Revenue/Net Revenue

Total annual revenue is net proceeds generated from the sale of products or services. This should reflect the selling price less any allowances such as quantity, discounts, rebates and returns. If your business entity is a support unit and therefore does not directly generate revenue, then provide the revenue amount for the units you support. For government/non-profit organizations, please use your non-pass-through budget. For insurance companies the total annual revenue is the total amount of direct written premiums, excluding net investment income. Note: Business entity revenue needs to only include inter-company business segment revenue when the transactions between those business segments are intended to reflect an arm's length transfer price and would therefore meet the regulatory requirements for external revenue reporting.

Process efficiency

Process efficiency represents how well a process converts its inputs into outputs. A process that converts 100% of the inputs into outputs without waste is more efficient than one that converts a similar amount of inputs into fewer outputs.

Median

The metric value which represents the 50th percentile of a peer group. This could also be communicated as the metric value where half of the peer group sample shows lower performance than the expressed metric value or half of the peer group sample shows higher performance than the expressed metric value.

Full-time Employee, Part-time Employee, and Temporary Employee

Full-time Employee

For the purpose of this survey, a regular full-time employee is hired for an indefinite period of time and is normally scheduled to work forty hours per week. Appointment is continuous, subject to satisfactory performance and availability of funding.

Part-time Employee

For the purpose of this survey, a regular part-time employee is hired for an indefinite period of time and is scheduled to work less than forty hours per week.

Temporary Employee

A temporary employee is employed for a finite period of time, to fulfill a time-limited role, or to fill the role of a permanent employee who is absent from work. The length of time an employee can work for the organization and be considered a temporary employee may be governed by employment legislation.

Business Entity

For survey purposes, a business entity is defined as an entity that:

  1. performs significant aspects of the processes for the surveys identified, or
  2. is part of a cost or revenue center within the company.

Within your organization, diverse departments may be geographically co-located, with closely integrated operations that form part of one "business entity" which may be a great distance apart. When trying to determine if related parts of your operation should be considered a single business entity, look for the following characteristics:

  • Do they operate closely together?
  • Do they serve many of the same customers?
  • Do they support the same region or product group?
  • Do they share any performance measures?
  • Is data meaningful at a consolidated level?

Examples of business entity definition:

  1. A general ledger accounting unit located in Germany has two groups. One performs general ledger accounting for the corporate headquarters, which has three business units. The other group does general ledger accounting for one of the three business units. In spite of their geographic co-location, their roles are substantially different and consolidating their data into a single response would make it less meaningful. Each group should be treated as a separate business entity.
  2. Three business units within a corporation use a shared services center for accounts payable and expense reimbursement, but are self-supporting for the other financial processes. The best approach is to make the shared services centre a separate business entity for accounts payable and expense reimbursement, and to retain the three original business units for the other financial processes.
  3. A global manufacturing company has five plant locations, each manufacturing product and each with its own logistics operations. For purposes of completing a manufacturing and logistics survey, they should be treated as five separate business entities.

Measure Scope

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Cross Industry (7.2.1)

  • 13.5.2.1 - Assess maturity of existing KM initiatives (11110) - Evaluating if initiatives are effective or should be discarded. Design a framework for assessing maturity, typically from Level 1 (undefined), Level 2 (repeatable), Level 3 (defined), and Level 4 (managed) through Level 5 (optimized).
  • 13.5.2.2 - Evaluate existing KM approaches (11111) - Evaluating existing procedures, policies, and guidelines for knowledge management. Study and examine the organization's approach against industry best practices by benchmarking, competitive analysis, etc.
  • 13.5.2.3 - Identify gaps and needs (11112) - Assessing the KM approach evaluations in order to identify any gaps or needs. Compare the performance of the KM approach against the desired or expected performance, as well as against the standard knowledge management industry approach.