Working Out Loud as a Solution to Boost KM Engagement

Lauren Trees's picture

Getting people to visit virtual communities and repositories and view what’s posted there is hard. Convincing them to answer questions and proactively submit best practices, lessons, and other content is even harder. This is reflected in the classic 90-9-1 rule, which suggests that 90 percent of participants in an online community or collaboration site will be passive, meaning they will read content but will not actively contribute.

Smarter Content Delivery for Smarter KM

Lauren Trees's picture

I recently spoke with Simon Trussler, director of Iknow LLC, to discuss the continuing challenges that many organizations face with findability and usability of enterprise knowledge. Iknow is sponsoring APQC’s 2019 Knowledge Management Conference, and Simon will be speaking as part of our High-Tech Solutions to Knowledge Problems track.

Make KM Communities and Collaboration Irresistible

Lauren Trees's picture

Putting communities and collaboration tools in place is one thing; getting people to actually use them is another. A lot of knowledge management efforts fizzle out because they fail to catch fire with employees. And given how many organizations are currently going through digital transformations (66%) and moving collaboration to the cloud (49%), the problem of engaging users in the midst of rapid technological change feels more common—and daunting—than ever.

Agile and Design Thinking Top List of 2019 Knowledge Management Trends

Lauren Trees's picture

January is the perfect time to revisit what’s hot—and what’s not—in knowledge management. New tools and techniques crop up all the time, but trends can quickly fizzle out if they don’t deliver the results their proponents promise. So, what’s trending right now, and what does it tell us about the state of KM?

Why and How to Measure Your Knowledge Management Program’s Performance

Lauren Trees's picture

Measurement has always been a divisive topic in KM. Some knowledge managers insist that anecdotal evidence is more powerful than data and that the energy involved in calculating KM’s business impact would be better spent improving the organization’s KM offerings. This attitude is understandable. It takes a lot of energy to prove KM’s worth, the exercise does not in itself generate any value for the organization, and executives who are skeptical of KM may rationalize away even the most carefully constructed metrics.

Why It’s So Hard to Engage Senior Leaders in KM—And What to Do About It

Lauren Trees's picture

Executives are very busy people. They can also be skeptical when it comes to new initiatives, especially when they can’t immediately see how an investment will translate to the bottom line. That’s a big factor in why it’s so hard for knowledge management teams to get leaders on their side, much less convince them to become active participants in KM platforms and approaches.

The Most Effective Messages to Motivate KM Participation

Lauren Trees's picture

Motivating employees to share and reuse knowledge has always been the holy grail of knowledge management. But what actually convinces people to change their habits and incorporate KM into their daily activities—to join a community, answer questions in an online forum, post and edit content, or search for lessons learned? 

What Are the Best Knowledge Management Reporting Relationships?

Lauren Trees's picture

Where should knowledge management sit on the org chart? I’ve been asked this question countless times, usually by KM leaders hoping to get their programs in front of the right influencers. My traditional answer is a little wishy-washy and boils down to: KM programs can—and do—report almost anywhere, and the best option depends on context.

When and How Much to Invest in Knowledge Management Technology

Lauren Trees's picture

At APQC, we’ve long argued that your knowledge management strategy should dictate decisions about technology, not the other way around. Companies that chase every new KM “solution” without a clear business case rarely get the results they’re looking for. But analysis of APQC’s benchmarking data shows that technology investment is an integral component of knowledge management success.

How Does Your KM Program Stack Up Against the Competition?

Lauren Trees's picture

Competitiveness is ingrained in human nature. We like feedback on our own performance, but we also like to peek over the fence to see what others are doing—and if they’re doing it better than we are. The same is true in knowledge management. If you’re involved in a KM program, you’re probably curious how your results compare to others, especially organizations that look like yours or have similar knowledge-related goals.