How Knowledge Collaboration Affects Engineers’ Expertise Development

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I recently spoke with Silky Wong, a structural engineer at Fluor with an interest in improving knowledge sharing and collaboration in the engineering discipline. She is involved in research on this topic through Texas Tech University. If you are an engineer currently working in a non-academic environment, please consider taking the survey associated with her research.

Why is knowledge sharing and collaboration so important for today’s engineers?

How Wikis Can Relieve Knowledge Management Pain

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I talked to Béatrice Le Moing, knowledge management program manager at Schneider Electric, about how her organization deployed a successful global wiki-encyclopedia in less than a year.

Béatrice Le Moing will be a breakout session speaker at APQC’s 2017 Knowledge Management Conference April 27-28. You can learn more about APQC’s 2017’s KM Conference here.

You can learn more about Schneider Electric at their website

8 Ways You Should Be Supporting Your Communities of Practice, But Aren’t

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You’ve probably heard that old saying, “Don’t put the cart before the horse.” It’s hard to picture that visual in today’s era of cars and freeways, but once you do, it’s easy to imagine that the cart isn’t going anywhere when the arrangement is backward.

Today is National Backward Day: the one day of the year when it makes sense to do things backward, just for the sake of a laugh. But doing things in reverse isn’t usually a good idea—and that’s especially true when starting a new knowledge management initiative.

Getting People to Actually Like Virtual Collaboration

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What are the biggest disconnects between how people currently work and how they want to work, and what can organizations do to improve the future of work for everyone? This fall, APQC surveyed more than 1,000 people about their current work experiences and what changes would make them happier and more productive.

Skeptics Beware: Communities of Practice Are the Real Deal

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I read on Facebook that October 13 is International Skeptics Day.

Or is it?

If you’re like me, you’ve probably learned to view a lot of what you see on social media with a skeptical eye. You figured out a long time ago that just about anyone can create a meme designed to convince you that aliens are coming, a politician is up to no good, or clowns are lurking behind every corner. And you’re not buying it.

3 Surprising Knowledge Management Workspace Trends

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It feels like I can’t open a browser these days without encountering a sweeping statement about the future of work. A lot of the headlines are intentionally over the top, from robots coming to take your job to Millennials not wanting to work. But beyond the clickbait, people’s relationship to work is changing.

The Procrastination Situation

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Today, September 6, is Fight Procrastination Day. About a week ago, I decided this would be a great topic for a blog post. But then Labor Day weekend came and went, and this morning found me sitting at my desk, typing furiously, finally putting down all the thoughts that have been bubbling in my brain while I enjoyed some downtime these last few days.

Knowledge Management Spotlight: How Hewlett Packard Enterprise Reused Knowledge to Increase Profitability

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Grey Cook and Vijayanandam M V of Hewlett Packard Enterprise Software Professional Services explain how their organization needed to find ways to increase profitability through the reuse and harvesting of massive amounts of knowledge created every year.

What’s Just Over the Horizon for Knowledge Management?

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I recently sat down with Bernie Palowitch, President of Iknow LLC, to talk about the current state of knowledge management; the biggest developments he sees in the near-term future; and the range of challenges that KM practitioners face in developing KM strategies, picking the right tools, and building organizational cultures that emphasize and value knowledge sharing and reuse. A few of his most intriguing responses are below.

What Can Mentoring Do for Your Workplace? The Answer May Surprise You

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When I started scoping APQC’s Workplace Mentoring study, I thought I understood why organizations encourage employees to mentor and be mentored. First, mentoring is an inexpensive way to build employee skills and competencies so that they can become high performers and move up the ranks.  Second, the mentoring experience makes mentees feel nurtured and valued—and thus more likely to stay with their current employers.