5 Things You Are Ignoring About Managing Process Improvement

Jeffery Varney's picture

Lean this, improve that, cut operating cost by x%... whatever the approach might be, the drive to improve performance within our departments and work groups is always there. Even in times where we are just looking to sustain what we do, maintain market share, or stabilize a product; human nature compels us to look for ways to make things simpler, easier, and less challenging. And when department and personal scorecards and compensation are at stake, the impulse is even stronger.

Giving Services their Proper Place in the PCF

Jeffery Varney's picture

Why sell a light bulb when you can sell a lighting system? The design, installation, operation and maintenance of more capable lighting systems that leverage advanced automation and control provides a service to customers beyond just the purpose of a bulb itself. When we look at traditionally product-based organizations there is often an evident shift to add services to their offering.  Rather than just manufacture and sell a product, organizations chose to also sell and deliver a service that uses or supports their product.

Process Management Is a Team Sport

Jeffery Varney's picture

In my previous blog post, I talked about random acts of improvement — when change initiatives are undertaken across the organization, with good intentions, but without oversight and alignment. While there may be localized improvement, employees use resources that might have been better applied to a more important need, or worse yet, the change can break another part of the organization, minimizing the gains or having an overall negative effect.

Cut the Clutter of Random Acts of Improvement

Jeffery Varney's picture

When discussing process management and improvement, I often talk about the concept of “random acts of improvement.” People, with good intentions, are off trying to make their part of the organization better, more efficient, simpler. But often these changes are done locally, in silos, without considering the end-to-end impact of the change – how that change might have a positive or negative effect elsewhere in the organization.