The Latest and Greatest in KM

Lauren Trees's picture

This morning, I gave a 30-minute presentation highlighting the best KM content APQC has published so far this year. If you want to find out what’s new and exciting in the Knowledge Base, I recommend listening to this recording of the presentation or downloading the slides. The slides are particularly useful because they provide direct links to all our latest content.

How’s Your KM Budget Doing?

Lauren Trees's picture

At APQC’s KM conference this year, Carla O’Dell asked the audience how their KM budgets had fared in the last year. The results were mixed, but mostly positive: Almost half the attendees said there had been little or no change between 2010 and 2011, while another 40+ percent said their budgets had increased.

What happened to your KM budget in 2011, compared to 2010?

Two Heads Are Better Than One

Lauren Trees's picture

Teamwork isn’t just for the volleyball court anymore. Phenomena like Amazon.com user reviews and Wikipedia have taught us about “the wisdom of crowds” while Web-enabled tools have made it possible to partner with people anywhere in the world. As a result, more and more organizations are asking employees to apply their collective knowledge to tackle tricky problems and come up with new and innovative ideas.

Where Are You Now? Assessing Your KM Program

Lauren Trees's picture

APQC has lots of comprehensive surveys and assessments that will provide a detailed picture of your organization’s performance. But did you know that you can get a “quick and dirty” status check on your knowledge management program in just five minutes?

Find Out What the Competition’s Up To

Lauren Trees's picture

APQC has started compiling its best KM case studies so you can find the examples you need in one place. Take a look at the collections below and learn what industry leaders are doing to make sure that knowledge gets to people when and where they need it.

Seven Drivers of Community Success

Lauren Trees's picture

APQC President Carla O’Dell refers to communities of practice as the “killer app” for knowledge management. By bringing people together around common areas of interest, communities help organizations achieve a multitude of knowledge-focused goals, from capturing lessons learned and validating best practices to identifying experts and answering tricky technical questions.