‘The Martian’s’ Andy Weir on premortem planning for a manned NASA mission to Mars

Carla O'Dell's picture

Like many of you, as the weather cools and the summer fades, APQC is knee-deep in strategic planning. Since APQC has access to many best practices, we try to follow them. One is to conduct a premortem on planned investments, a technique borrowed from project planning, in which one attempts to imagine what could go wrong and decide how to avoid or mitigate those risks. Doesn’t this go against the socially acceptable stance of being an optimist?

Want Change Management That Works? Have a Clear Simple Message

Carla O'Dell's picture

I know I am not Steve Jobs. But I am a pretty good version of myself. According to Nick Tasler, change management consultant and keynote speaker at APQC's upcoming 2015 Process Conference, that might be ok.

Knowledge Transfer Is a Process, Not An Event

Lauren Trees's picture

Below is a video made by Carrie Tracy, senior knowledge manager at RelayHealth (McKesson Corporation), previewing her breakout session at the 2015 APQC Process Conference October 29-30. In this great cartoon, she gives a sneak peak of her session, including the concerted process design that has enabled RelayHealth to optimize internal knowledge transfer so that learners retain the correct level of information while instructors understand the audience and deliver the right information to the right people at the right time.

To Make Change Management Work, Clean out your Organization's Closets (aka priorities)

Carla O'Dell's picture

Have you noticed how hard it is to get rid of things even though you never use them? Think about the last time you cleaned out your closet or garage. Are you still holding on to an out of style sweater or a bicycle you never seem to get around to riding?

Psychologists call this common human weakness “the endowment effect” because we endow things we already own with more value than we would otherwise. It makes it very hard to let go of something probably not serving you anymore.

‘The Martian’ author Andy Weir on Learning and Applying Knowledge

Carla O'Dell's picture

"I'm gonna have to science the ##$^ out of this!"

So says Mark Watney, lead character in the best-selling book and soon to be released movie The Martian starring Matt Damon and Jessica Chastain. Faced with death, Watney had compelling motivation to become an expert in survival on Mars.

I was curious about how a non-engineer learned enough to write such an accurate book. (According to NASA; I wouldn’t know.)  

Unlearning: NASA Meets SpaceX

Carla O'Dell's picture

As part of my quest to understand how people become experts more quickly in complex scientific and technical disciplines, I interviewed Edward J. Hoffman, chief knowledge officer (CKO) at NASA. This is the second of two blogs on my conversation with Ed. You can check out the first one and learn more about Ed's role here.

How NASA’s Chief Knowledge Officer Drives Change

Carla O'Dell's picture

 As part of my quest to understand how people become experts more quickly in complex scientific and technical disciplines, I interviewed Edward J. Hoffman, chief knowledge officer (CKO) at NASA. Ed ought to know: he founded the NASA Academy of Program/Project and Engineering Leadership and was its director for 20 years before his current CKO gig.

Benefits and Challenges of Enterprise Search in Knowledge Management

Lauren Trees's picture

Anyone following APQC’s recent content management research knows that an excellent enterprise search capability—one that surfaces the best content, conversations, and experts for a given query—is essential for organizations that want to maximize the value of their knowledge assets.  In this video Diane Berry, senior vice president of market strategy at Coveo, explains how enterprise search can improve a KM program and the challenge of getting it right.

The Secret Knowledge Management Asset You Need To Stop Ignoring

Jim Lee's picture

Dorothy Leonard’s excellent insights in her recent CLO article 5 Ways to Ensure Critical Knowledge Transfer were a great reminder of the importance of “getting ahead of the game” when it comes to retaining an organization’s knowledge. But why was it even necessary to write it?

Knowledge Management Maturity Model Resources, Examples, and Tools

Lauren Trees's picture

Earlier this week, I Reaching knowledge management maturityreceived a question through APQC’s Ask Us service from a member who wanted to read more about organizations that have achieved level 4 or 5 on APQC’s Levels of Knowledge Management Maturity scale. I get asked this question at least a few times every month, so I thought it would make sense to share some resources and examples here.