Capitalizing on Curiosity – How Mining Employee Knowledge Can Deliver a Competitive Edge

Lauren Trees's picture

Curious Events Day, which arrived without much fanfare on October 9, merits significantly more attention than it is likely to get. Imagine a day dedicated to indulging your curiosity!

Curiosity is a motivator. People who are curious want to know how things work and why things are the way they are. And as they discover the “hows” and “whys,” they begin to look at things in a different way, which leads to novel ideas and perspectives.

A Multi-Generational Model for Collaboration

Carla O'Dell's picture

The main reason I go to the Aspen Ideas Festival is for the new ideas, models, and people.

I never would have met Henry Elkus elsewhere. 

Henry is a twenty-something entrepreneur who envisioned a global network in his Yale dorm room.

What Generation X Wants from the Workspace of the Future

Rachele Collins's picture

Due to their sheer volume in the workplace, we are constantly bombarded with information and analysis about what the Millennial generation (born in the early 1980’s to the late 1990’s) desires in terms of workplace expectations, office environment, norms, and culture. However, there are at least two other generations (Baby Boomers, born in the mid 1940’s to the mid 1960’s; and Generation X, born in the mid 1960’s to early 1980’s) in the workplace today that are largely ignored in terms of all of the attention and hype, but still nonetheless important.

Overconfidence in Full Effect

Michael Sims's picture

Every so often, I hear the hilarious statistic cited that ninety percent of drivers think that they are better than the average driver. It goes without saying that this is a mathematical impossibility. And it demonstrates the proven cognitive bias known as “illusory superiority.” Why, in an evolutionary sense, humans ended up overestimating their own abilities is beyond me (although it’s a stimulating web search rabbit hole), but it never ceases to astonish me when I see it.

How Do Productive People Do It?

Carla O'Dell's picture

Why are some people more productive than others?

To find out, I asked two stellar and productive past Big Thinkers to “Describe the circumstances under which you are most productive.” 

What Do Millennials Want Out Of Work?

Carla O'Dell's picture

This year's Aspen Ideas Festival was highly tweetable, especially two tracks particularly relevant to the future of knowledge management (KM) and knowledge work in general.

All or Nothing: Why Commitment Is Essential for KM Program Success

Lauren Trees's picture

July 26 was “All or Nothing Day,” which encourages people to go “all in” to break through barriers, conquer fears, and make commitments.

One of the biggest stumbling blocks to achieving success is lukewarm commitment. This is particularly true for knowledge management programs. Half measures are not enough. If you don’t go all in with a commitment to long-term plans and dedicate resources for evaluation and improvement, you are likely to get little in return.

Why Knowledge Management Should Embrace Budget Constraints

Carla O'Dell's picture

As budgeting time approaches, our thoughts turn to how to wrangle more money for knowledge management (KM). Think of all the things we could do if we had a few more bucks.

Maybe we should be careful what we ask for. 

6 Reasons Why Rockwell Collins Has Great Knowledge Management and You Don’t

Lauren Trees's picture

Every knowledge manager is looking for a silver bullet that will make KM successful in their organization. Unfortunately, as many of you know, building a world-class knowledge management program isn’t “paint by numbers.” The best approach depends on the business problems KM is intended to solve, the level of buy-in from senior and middle management, the underlying IT infrastructure, the organizational culture, and a host of other contextual factors.

Cognitive Computing and KM: Brace for Impact

Lauren Trees's picture

Today is Meteor Day 2017, and it has been about 66 million years since a giant asteroid crashed into the Earth, wiping out the dinosaurs. Just last month, a new BBC documentary revealed that it wasn’t the size of the asteroid that did it – it was the fact that the giant object made impact in the worst possible spot, creating massive amounts of vaporized rock.