How Knowledge Managers Can Lead Virtual Teams to Success

Mercy Harper's picture

Virtual teaming promises amazing opportunities, but it can also create big problems. When employees don’t meet face-to-face, they sometimes hesitate to trust one another and collaborate. Flexible virtual teams, where team members come and go during different project phases, can struggle to locate important documentation and expertise when and where they need it.

Why and How to Measure Your Knowledge Management Program’s Performance

Lauren Trees's picture

Measurement has always been a divisive topic in KM. Some knowledge managers insist that anecdotal evidence is more powerful than data and that the energy involved in calculating KM’s business impact would be better spent improving the organization’s KM offerings. This attitude is understandable. It takes a lot of energy to prove KM’s worth, the exercise does not in itself generate any value for the organization, and executives who are skeptical of KM may rationalize away even the most carefully constructed metrics.

How to Build Trust and Engagement with Virtual Teams

Mercy Harper's picture

Virtual teams have become the new normal. But with so many organizations currently engaged in digital transformations, the virtual teams of tomorrow are going to be different from those of today. The transition to a more digital workplace will bring new tools, new priorities, and new ways of working that are certain to impact how organizations approach virtual teaming. To learn more about what to expect, I spoke with APQC’s Lauren Trees, principal research lead for knowledge management, and Cindy Hubert, executive director of client solutions.

Why It’s So Hard to Engage Senior Leaders in KM—And What to Do About It

Lauren Trees's picture

Executives are very busy people. They can also be skeptical when it comes to new initiatives, especially when they can’t immediately see how an investment will translate to the bottom line. That’s a big factor in why it’s so hard for knowledge management teams to get leaders on their side, much less convince them to become active participants in KM platforms and approaches.

KM Fills a Gap in AI Projects

Carla O'Dell's picture

I, along with my colleague Lauren Trees, recently interviewed 21 organizations applying artificial intelligence (AI) and robotic process automation (RPA) internally and found that the organizations that had made the most progress, had the most experimentation, and were having the most successful AI pilots were creating alliances across the organization to do it.  APQC metrics research offers further support that close alliances are key to successful and sustainable KM programs. 

Future Proofing Your KM Program

Carla O'Dell's picture

There is an AI/automation arms race underway between the big players—IBM, Amazon, Alphabet, Microsoft, and Facebook – and knowledge management is the beneficiary.  Turns out, KM tasks such as content management, tagging, search, and expertise location are good targets for AI and might really augment the KM team.

The Most Effective Messages to Motivate KM Participation

Lauren Trees's picture

Motivating employees to share and reuse knowledge has always been the holy grail of knowledge management. But what actually convinces people to change their habits and incorporate KM into their daily activities—to join a community, answer questions in an online forum, post and edit content, or search for lessons learned? 

Digitalization is a Team Sport

Mercy Harper's picture

Organizations are funneling vast amounts of time and money into digitalization. And while there’s a lot of advice about which tech to buy and business areas to invest in, the people side of digitalization is also important. Without a people-focused strategy, digitalization can amplify organizational silos and breed discontent in the workforce. I talked with Dr. Carla O’Dell to learn how organizations can take a smarter approach to digitalization.

What Are the Best Knowledge Management Reporting Relationships?

Lauren Trees's picture

Where should knowledge management sit on the org chart? I’ve been asked this question countless times, usually by KM leaders hoping to get their programs in front of the right influencers. My traditional answer is a little wishy-washy and boils down to: KM programs can—and do—report almost anywhere, and the best option depends on context.

4-Step Guide to Knowledge Mapping

Mercy Harper's picture

Knowledge mapping is one of the most powerful knowledge management (KM) approaches. A knowledge map is a visual representation of the organization’s intellectual capital. With it, stakeholders can pinpoint where critical knowledge is, how it flows, and any barriers or gaps. This helps companies focus resources on the most dangerous knowledge risks and the most fruitful knowledge opportunities.