David Eagleman Explains Why Getting Off Autopilot Will Improve KM

Carla O'Dell's picture

Knowledge, regardless of how we eventually slice, dice, or splice it, starts in a brain somewhere. So if we want to “manage” knowledge, we ought to understand a bit about how the brain works. Fortunately, neuroscience is having a moment…well, more accurately a decade. Cool tools like fMRI (Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging) let neuroscientists peek into your brain without poking holes in your skull to get a picture of what is happening in there, real time. Experts like Dr.

KM Engagement, Exploration and Why It Leads To Better Knowledge Flow

Carla O'Dell's picture

We all enjoy talking and listening to people who agree with us. We have our favorite talk radio hosts and TV pundits.  Listening to the “other guys” just annoys us. That search for confirmation may keep us comfortable, but it does nothing to keep us creative or agile in the face of change.

Why KM Communities of Practice Need More than Sharing to Be Worthwhile

Carla O'Dell's picture

As those of us who practice knowledge management (KM) intuitively believe, the easy flow of ideas can make groups more productive and creative.

Introducing APQC's Big Thinkers, Big Ideas Interview Series

Carla O'Dell's picture

Get used to hearing “Welcome to Big Thinkers, Big Ideas,” as it will be my standard greeting for our new APQC podcast series launching tomorrow. What’s to follow will be anything but standard. This series is my chance to interview some of the most interesting people in and around the world of business.

APQC 2015 Knowledge Management Conference Sneak Preview Video

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I’d like to share with you a video preview for APQC’s 20th Annual Knowledge Management Conference and pre-conference workshops. This is the premier event for networking and sharing innovative ideas with the brightest minds in KM.

Cognitive Psychology, Knowledge Management, and Why Not Everything Is Important

Carla O'Dell's picture

The most recent entrant in the cottage industry of cognitive psychology books, Daniel Leviten’s new book The Organized Mind, attempts to help us sort through the vast amount of information demanding our attention daily. Leviten claims we are victims of our evolutionary and inadequate attentional filter.

5 Instances When It’s Safe to Rely on KM Community Instead of an Expert

Carla O'Dell's picture

Senior technical experts can be in short supply, especially if your organization has lots of projects underway. New employees and novices may not know where to turn or may be reluctant to bother or look stupid in front of an expert. One way to cope with a shortage of experts is to appeal to the members of your network for help.

Technical communities of practice can be a wonderful alternative, but not always. When is it safe to use a community of practice or technical network to help with a problem or answer a question?

U.S Postal Service is Leveraging Its Strengths: Is Your KM Program?

Carla O'Dell's picture

It is probably old news to you, but I was taken aback to read an article in Wall Street Journal (WSJ) written August 4, 2014 by Laura Stevens. It said that Fed Ex and UPS use the U.S. Postal Service to deliver many of their ground packages, and Amazon is leveraging our dear old USPS, too. According to the WSJ, “For FedEx alone, the post office delivers an average of 2.2 million packages a day, or about 30% of the express-mail company's total U.S.

What ‘The Secrets of the Grown up Brain’ Can Tell Us About Having A Happier Outlook

Carla O'Dell's picture

I always have my eye open for research that might tell us more about how to leverage the expertise in our organizations, from novices to experts.  I stumbled across The Secret Life of the Grown up Brain (2010) I appreciated the highly readable, research-based and optimistic account of the (then) state of the cognitive, social and emotional development of the brain over a lifespan.

Top Three Approaches to Grow and Leverage Technical Expertise

Carla O'Dell's picture

In my last post on making the most of technical expertise, I talked about three knowledge gaps technical leaders are contending with: turning mid-career employees (aka “nex’perts”) into experts, speeding up the learning curve for novices and new hires, and creating new innovations and solutions. Earlier this year, APQC surveyed more than 750 people to find out what they’re doing to close these gaps and which tools and approaches are most effective.