What Are Your Knowledge Managers Afraid Of?

Lauren Trees's picture

Looking at the jack-o’-lanterns and inflatable spiders dotting my neighborhood this week, I started thinking about childhood fears—and grownup ones. I’m more likely to worry about the lure of leftover mini Snickers than ghosts or goblins, but the things that really keep me up at night tend to be “the big stuff,” such as work and family.

Cognitive Psychology, Knowledge Management, and Why Not Everything Is Important

Carla O'Dell's picture

The most recent entrant in the cottage industry of cognitive psychology books, Daniel Leviten’s new book The Organized Mind, attempts to help us sort through the vast amount of information demanding our attention daily. Leviten claims we are victims of our evolutionary and inadequate attentional filter.

What Industry Spends the Most on IT? The Answer Will Surprise You

Mercy Harper's picture

We turned to APQC’s Open Standards Benchmarking to find out how median IT cost compares across industries. Our findings are in the infographic below, which reveals some pretty significant differences in IT cost among different industries. Certainly different IT needs—as well as differences in revenue—shaped the results, and high IT cost isn’t necessarily a bad thing. Did these results surprise you?

5 Instances When It’s Safe to Rely on KM Community Instead of an Expert

Carla O'Dell's picture

Senior technical experts can be in short supply, especially if your organization has lots of projects underway. New employees and novices may not know where to turn or may be reluctant to bother or look stupid in front of an expert. One way to cope with a shortage of experts is to appeal to the members of your network for help.

Technical communities of practice can be a wonderful alternative, but not always. When is it safe to use a community of practice or technical network to help with a problem or answer a question?

What happens when political motivations trump process improvements?

Holly Lyke-Ho-Gland's picture

APQC recently held a panel discussion on how organizations can take advantage of a holistic strategy encompassing an intersection of knowledge, process, and quality management. APQC’s Travis Colton, Jim Lee, and Jeff Varney collectively responded to this follow-up discussion from the panel:

5 Weird Terms that Knowledge Management People Use

Mercy Harper's picture

New to knowledge management (KM)? It’s easy to feel lost in the lingo at first; but you’ll learn the ropes quickly, because KM is a structured solution for a problem most of us have faced before: how do we connect people with what they need to know, so that they can do their best work?

For example, I recently moved and had to switch a utility service to my new townhouse. But when the service guys showed up, they started running into problems. Everything seemed in order in the house, so it must have been a problem with the box outside.

What Will Future of Knowledge Management Work Be Like?

Jim Lee's picture

The workplace of the future won’t be a place at all. It will be anyplace, anytime, by any technology. Of course, the mantra of “always on, always connected” is well known by many already so why aren’t we there yet? It’s about the business rules; the rules that have yet to be written. To wit, one organization creates an email moratorium rule in order for people to focus on other things. Another goes even further by attempting to eliminate email altogether. Another creates a rule that says instantaneous responses to colleague requests are expected.

U.S Postal Service is Leveraging Its Strengths: Is Your KM Program?

Carla O'Dell's picture

It is probably old news to you, but I was taken aback to read an article in Wall Street Journal (WSJ) written August 4, 2014 by Laura Stevens. It said that Fed Ex and UPS use the U.S. Postal Service to deliver many of their ground packages, and Amazon is leveraging our dear old USPS, too. According to the WSJ, “For FedEx alone, the post office delivers an average of 2.2 million packages a day, or about 30% of the express-mail company's total U.S.

What Scarlett Johannson Can Tell Us about the Future of Mobile Technology

Mercy Harper's picture

“I’ll build a computer and download my knowledge in it,” says Scarlett Johannson in the new movie Lucy. Yes, this is a sci-fi film with a fantastical premise, but when I heard this line my brain went straight to thinking how mobile technology can enable effective knowledge and content management. Let me tell you how I got there.

5 Ways To Get Leaders to Buy Into Change Management

Cindy Hubert's picture

The most memorable words of advice I’ve heard for people leading change is to play out your hunches; roll with the punches; and make the best of what comes your way. It’s catchy and easy to say, but much more difficult to figure out the science and art of “hunches and punches.”  How do KM leaders get leaders at all levels in the organization ready for changes that inevitably come from building a program focused on helping knowledge flow?