3 Ways To Get Buy In for Process Improvement

Jess Scheer's picture

We’re process people.

We are in awe of Ikea’s ability to standardize the design of beds, bookcases, and boudoirs using the same handful of parts. We assign family chores using SIPOCs and RACIs.  We love frameworks and good relationship maps.

PMO Imperative: Closing the Skill Gap to Support Strategic Initiatives (Infographic)

Holly Lyke-Ho-Gland's picture

Strategy implementation is by far the hardest part of strategic planning and requires many of the skills project management offices (PMOs) exhibit—core competencies (e.g., time management and problem solving) and softer skills (e.g., leadership and communications). To better understand what contributes to PMO’s assignment to strategic initiatives, APQC conducted correlation analysis on its recent survey, Defining Characteristics of Next Generation PMOs data.

What happens when political motivations trump process improvements?

Holly Lyke-Ho-Gland's picture

APQC recently held a panel discussion on how organizations can take advantage of a holistic strategy encompassing an intersection of knowledge, process, and quality management. APQC’s Travis Colton, Jim Lee, and Jeff Varney collectively responded to this follow-up discussion from the panel:

3 Reasons Great Process Improvement Culture Starts at the Bottom

Holly Lyke-Ho-Gland's picture

I recently spoke to Fabio Cardeso, process excellence director - International Operations General Motors Financial, about the pitfalls of outsourcing the documentation of process failures, why people hide inefficiencies, the identification of risks in processes, and why he believes a great process culture starts from the bottom up and not the top down.

APQC: Why can outsourcing the documentation of process failures not always be the best idea?

David Shaner on Why Fast Change Often Fails

Jonathan Kraft's picture

APQC was lucky enough to talk to David Shaner about his book ‘The Seven Arts of Change’ and specifically about how his ‘Golden Rule’ can help in leading change in an organization.  David will be the keynote speaker at APQC’s 2014 Process Conference on October 13-15.

Tale of Two PMOs (Infographic)

Holly Lyke-Ho-Gland's picture

Project management offices (PMOs) are moving beyond typical project management activities, and are now providing more strategic insights and services that support enterprise-wide initiatives. In order to more fully understand the role PMOs are playing within their organizations, APQC conducted a survey to understand the key characteristics necessary to provide strategic support. This infographic explores the differences between large revenue organizations (greater than $20B) and small revenue organizations (less than $100M).

David Shaner explains why Organizational Change needs a Golden Rule

Jonathan Kraft's picture

APQC was lucky enough to talk to David Shaner about his book ‘The Seven Arts of Change’ and specifically about how his ‘Golden Rule’ can help lead change in an organization.  David will be the keynote speaker at APQC’s 2014 Process Conference on October 13-15.

 

How to Get People to Focus on Process and Not Results

Jonathan Kraft's picture

C. Jackson Grayson is the Founder and Executive Chairman of APQC.  I interviewed Jack about why companies struggle to improve process, resist change, and how to get people to focus on process and not outcomes.  

Jack will be a presenter at the 2014 APQC Process Improvement Conference October 16-17.

If You Don’t Have These Big Q Enablers You are in Trouble

Jay Mankad's picture

Big Q and little q are terms discussed by Dr. Juran and is key in fully understanding the significance of quality, and how to achieve World Class premier and sustainable Quality.

 

Stop Focusing on Process Model Rules and Focus on Results

Holly Lyke-Ho-Gland's picture

I was able to talk to Ronald G. Ross Co-Founder & Principal, Business Rule Solutions, LLC and
Executive Editor, Business Rules Journal, about how to build a better business process model and why having too many rules can be a problem.

What is the main reason people still focus on making traditional process models?